Home4Community

Our proposal consists of houses, undeniably the kind of home that people dream of in Ireland. Our proposal feels open and green; this is what people dream of too. Our proposal has densities which make it land efficient. It feels suburban while having urban densities. Our proposal emphasises community. It provides a space that is appealing to live in.

Our proposal refreshes the idea of suburban development, taking elements of the system that work, and incorporating newer ideas about delivery, density, affordability, and place-making.

To be compliant nationally, there would need to be a small change of policy. The homes we propose here comply with all relevant building and planning regulations with one important exception: private outdoor space (gardens) would be slightly reduced, by approximately 20%, depending on the local authority.

How Home4Community works: collaborating with FastHouse (timber frame manufacturers) we developed a kit of parts that responds to flexibility, while being efficient to construct in their factory. All house types eliminate overlooking issues, and interlock back-to-back and side-to-side. New densities are created through careful design. This kind of density allows us to rethink the public open space between the houses, providing protected, friendly, and usable communal gardens.

ESTIMATED POTENTIAL NEW UNITS

Home4Community would yield 60 units per hectare.

Project

The Team

JFOC Architects 

FastHouse

 

Collaborators

Common Ground Community Led Housing 

Lagan Homes

Fabricators

FastHouse 

JFOC Architects

More Exhibitors

Eco:Cube – A Modular Living Concept

Eco:Cube – A Modular Living Concept

We need to rethink how housing is designed and developed in response to today’s challenges. Eco:Cube is a modular living concept which provides an alternative housing model to address issues of density, supply, housing quality, low carbon transitioning and future proofing.

Thirty-Three Churches

Thirty-Three Churches

The name of our proposal Thirty-Three Churches comes from the 33 churches identified in the Archdiocese of Dublin’s submission on the draft Dublin City Council Development Plan (2022–2028), in which these church sites were identified for potential rezoning to residential use.